Day: 28 octobre 2020

Sandbox Issue 263: A brand new experience: creating activations that connect in a non-live world

Lead: Experiential brand activations in a non-live world – Creating effective brand activations has never been easy – but there was one basic starting point: find an event with lots of people, and connect with them. With concerts and festivals curtailed for the next six months at least, brands are partnering with musicians online to create […]
The post Sandbox Issue 263: A brand new experience: creating activations that connect in a non-live world appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

UMG’s Bravado inks merch deal with Alibaba’s Tmall platform

2020 has been a really interesting year for Universal Music Group’s various arms in China. From local signings like Linong Chen and Sunnee to a joint label with Tencent Music, via gaming songwriting camps and the small matter of $1.2m of Taylor Swift album sales in a few days on NetEase Cloud Music.
Weaving these strands into the overall story of UMG’s China strategy is a task for another day, but today the major label group’s merchandise division announced its own latest deal in China.
Bravado is partnering with Alibaba Group, and will be opening a merch store on the latter company’s Tmall Global service to sell products for the likes of Tupac Shakur, Guns n’ Roses, the Rolling Stones and Bob Marley.
Oh, and Taylor Swift, who’ll be the new store’s first featured artist – the first time merch from her ‘Folklore’ album has been sold in China. In fact, Chinese fans will get its brand new merch drop two weeks before any other country.
The post UMG’s Bravado inks merch deal with Alibaba’s Tmall platform appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

FIFA 21 adds music-disabling option to help game streamers

The knock-on effects from rightsholders’ pressure on Twitch over music licensing are starting. Games publisher Electronic Arts has added a new menu option to its FIFA 21 game: ‘Disable All Music For Streaming Purposes’.
That means people streaming their gameplay on platforms like Twitch will now be able to do it without any background music that might generate copyright takedown notices for their videos.
FIFA is famous for its soundtracks mixing established artists with emerging acts. The unfortunate result of the standoff between rightsholders and Twitch is that this in-game discovery won’t be extended to Amazon’s live-streaming platform.
The post FIFA 21 adds music-disabling option to help game streamers appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Keychange movement expands in Poland with events this week

The Keychange initiative pressing for gender equality in the music industry – including on its live stages – has a new frontier this week.
Poland has become an official partner for the movement, and tomorrow will see an event co-hosted by Key Change and festival organiser Spring Break to introduce its first two ambassadors in Poland: Avtomat and Karolina Czarnecka.
The campaign is timely. “We have witnessed the dangerous politicization of gender in Poland this year with the President inciting hate speech as part of his reelection campaign,” said Magdalena Jensen, co-founder and managing partner at Chimes Agency, who’s planning this year’s Keychange training.
The post Keychange movement expands in Poland with events this week appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

It’s 2020 so of course there are now fake artist livestreams

There was good news for fans of musician Zoe Keating in late August: one of her cancelled gigs was being replaced by a ticketed livestream. The only downside: Keating knew nothing about it.
It had been created as an event on Facebook, with the people behind it taking fans money in the full knowledge that there would not be any performance to watch.
Music Technology Policy has the full story, including the unhelpful response from Facebook: the event did not violate its community standards.
A group including the Artist Rights Alliance has now gone straight to the top and written a letter to the US attorney general Bill Barr and the chair of the Federal Trade Commission asking them to investigate and “protect consumers, music fans, and artists from Facebook-driven fraud”. Ouch.
The post It’s 2020 so of course there are now fake artist livestreams appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Amuse expands its Fast Forward royalty advances service

Distributor Amuse launched its Fast Forward scheme in February 2019 as a way to pay artists up to six months of royalties in advance, based on its estimates of their future earnings.
The company now says that hundreds of artists have benefited from the feature, with advances between $250 and $300k.
Now Fast Forward is relaunching and expanding its focus, with artists now able to get advances for themselves and their collaborators – producers, managers and other musicians included.
The post Amuse expands its Fast Forward royalty advances service appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Dutch dance industry warns of Covid-19’s earnings impact

Electronic music is suffering considerably from the Covid-19 pandemic, given the difficulties of safely opening clubs and putting on live events at any scale.
The Netherlands may be in the most precarious position of all according to a new report presented at the ADE conference last week, and authored by Music Ally.
Figures from DJ Monitor/ Rightscheck.com, released in advance for the event, showed how the Netherlands is Europe’s leader when it comes to festivals (391 with a capacity of over 1000 people), with 85-90% of those estimated to be largely or wholly focused on electronic music.
The post Dutch dance industry warns of Covid-19’s earnings impact appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Tomorrowland says its virtual festival ‘about broke even’

Dance festival Tomorrowland sold nearly 140k tickets to its virtual festival earlier this year. Now the organisers have been talking to Billboard about how those sales translated into profit.
The answer: not quite, but not far off. Co-founder Michiel Beers said that the festival “about broke even” after Tomorrowland spent around $6m putting it together, with additional funding from sponsorships and media deals.
Now Tomorrowland is planning a follow up for New Year’s Eve, and even if the physical version of the festival returns next year, the virtual edition seems here to stay.
The post Tomorrowland says its virtual festival ‘about broke even’ appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Aller à la barre d’outils