Day: 2 octobre 2020

TikTok creator fund reportedly paying 2-4 cents per 1,000 views

TikTok’s Creator Fund started as a $200m commitment in July to be distributed among US-based TikTokers trying to build careers on the platform. It quickly expanded to a promised $1bn over three years, with a European fund following in September aiming for $300m over three years.
Beyond those big headline numbers, though, details of how the funding works and how much money creators can make from it have been scarcer. This article on online-video industry site Tubefilter is worth a read, then.
The site has been canvassing some of the early recipients to assess the fund’s impact.
The post TikTok creator fund reportedly paying 2-4 cents per 1,000 views appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

ShareChat’s Times Music deal includes short-video app Moj

Moj is one of the short-video apps making hay in India in the wake of TikTok’s ban there. Launched in July, it grew to 50 million users within a month, then 80 million by late September, when its parent company ShareChat raised $40m of funding to continue the momentum.
ShareChat said then that partnerships with music labels would be one use for the funding: a sensible strategy, as Indian rightsholders have been rumbling about the lack of licences in the short-video space generally there.
A week on, there’s news of a deal: ShareChat has inked an agreement with Times Music that covers both Moj and its existing ShareChat social app. It includes Times Music’s catalogue, and also that of Punjabi-music label Speed Records.
The post ShareChat’s Times Music deal includes short-video app Moj appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Triller gets a licensing deal with pan-Euro licensing hub Ice

Triller has been making the most of TikTok’s recent troubles, poaching creators, trumpeting its user growth and even pitching itself in the US as “a form of patriotic capitalism”. But with that higher profile has come scrutiny of Triller’s licensing status, not least from US publishing body the NMPA.
On the other side of the Atlantic, in Europe, Triller has a new licensing deal in place today though. It’s with Ice, the pan-European licensing hub originally created by collecting societies PRS for Music, Gema and Stim.
“The deal covers Triller from its launch and will support the growing service by licensing it into 160+ territories for rights represented by Ice’s society and publisher rights holders,” announced Ice – the latter group including Concord, Downtown and Peermusic.
The post Triller gets a licensing deal with pan-Euro licensing hub Ice appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

WMG’s latest partnerships: Tips Music in India and SOSV in Asia

Post-IPO, there’s a flurry of dealmaking and senior appointments happening at Warner Music Group, as the company gears up for its next stage of growth. Today alone it has announced new partnerships with Indian company Tips Music and investment firm SOSV.
The former deal will see Warner Music India distributing the film-music label’s music in India, while WMG’s distribution division ADA will handle it worldwide.
“Tips’ Hindi YouTube content receives more than 5.1 billion views per month, so the appetite for its music is there for everyone to see,” said Warner Music India MD Jay Mehta.
The post WMG’s latest partnerships: Tips Music in India and SOSV in Asia appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

The bigger picture around Twitch, music licensing, and industry criticism

When we reported on the launch of Soundtrack by Twitch earlier this week, we had a sneaking suspicion that we’d be hearing from the publishing sector – and US representative body the NMPA’s boss David Israelite – sooner rather than later with some opinions. And lo, he’s one of the interviewees in a Rolling Stone follow-up about the wider question of whether a platform like Twitch needs proper sync licensing.
“Watching a video on Twitch is really no different than watching a television show or a movie. The people making television programming or movies — there’s no question that before they use music, they go out and secure the proper rights and they negotiate a fair compensation for the people who made the music,” said Israelite.
“Somehow, these giant Internet companies have convinced themselves that they should be playing under different rules. Instead of acting like someone broadcasting television or movie content to consumers, they want to pretend that it’s the users making the content that somehow have all the responsibility, and not the platform — despite the fact that they are making significant amounts of money from the activity.”
The post The bigger picture around Twitch, music licensing, and industry criticism appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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