Day: 5 août 2020

Sandbox Issue 258: KIDS’ STUFF. Music’s youngest and most powerful consumers

Lead: we report back on our recent New Kids On The Block: Insight Into A New Generation online conference that we ran in conjunction with UK trade bodies the BPI and ERA, drawing out the 10 key lessons from the different panels and presentations. These include: children are much more active (and increasingly so) than previously presumed; […]
The post Sandbox Issue 258: KIDS’ STUFF. Music’s youngest and most powerful consumers appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

PlayStation Plus and Disney+ both report subscription growth

We like to keep an eye on subscription-based entertainment businesses outside music, and yesterday two big companies’ financial results offered us some new data to consider.
Sony Corporation’s results included the announcement that there are now 44.9 million people paying for the PlayStation Plus service, up from 41.5 million a quarter ago.
PS Plus costs $9.99 a month, $24.99 a quarter or $59.99 a year, and enables people to play PlayStation 4 console games online, as well as getting two free PS4 games a month and various discounts. Sony’s wider PlayStation Network (a decent measure of PS4 owners) has 113 million monthly active users, so that’s a conversion rate of 39.7%.
The post PlayStation Plus and Disney+ both report subscription growth appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

NetEase Cloud Music ups moderation after ‘NetEmo’ meme

We’ve written before about one area where Chinese music streaming services like NetEase Cloud Music beat most of their western equivalents: they have a thriving comments ecosystem where listeners are giving their views on music.
The flipside of that: those western streaming services don’t have to worry about comment / community moderation, which can be challenging and sometimes controversial work. Just ask any social network.
By way of illustration, check the South China Morning Post’s article about the latest moderation challenge for NetEase Cloud Music. A meme called ‘NetEmo’ has been gaining popularity on its platform, focusing (seriously for some users, and jokingly for others) on feelings of anxiety and depression in 2020.
The post NetEase Cloud Music ups moderation after ‘NetEmo’ meme appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Hipgnosis buys royalties for Blondie co-founders’ catalogue

This will soon be the Daily Hipgnosis Cash-Splashing News Site if the company continues at this rate of snapping up music catalogues.
This morning’s announcement concerns Debbie Harry and Chris Stein, the co-founders of Blondie, who have sold 100% of their writer’s share and neighbouring rights royalties to Hipgnosis for an undisclosed amount. This is a catalogue of 197 songs.
“Their singles have been not only massively successful but era and genre defining. Equally well they have made cultural albums of the greatest importance,” said Hipgnosis founder Merck Mercuriadis.
The post Hipgnosis buys royalties for Blondie co-founders’ catalogue appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Indian labels hit short-video apps with infringement notices

It’s not just the US where short-video apps are facing pressure from music rightsholders over their licensing deals (or lack of). It’s happening in India too, where a number of these apps have been spiking in popularity since TikTok was banned there in June. 
Livemint reported that four music labels – including India’s biggest, T-Series – have been sending copyright infringement notices to short video apps.
“Many content sharing mobile applications such as Roposo, Triller, Takatak, Josh, Mitron, Snack Video etc are taking advantage of TikTok’s ban in India and to gain immediate success are using popular music, most of which belongs to T- Series without our permission,” said T-Series president Neeraj Kalyan.
The post Indian labels hit short-video apps with infringement notices appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

YouTube responds to Koda over Danish music takedowns

Earlier this week, we wrote about a controversy brewing Denmark with a dispute between collecting society Koda and YouTube.
Koda announced that YouTube would be removing its members music from its platform, after the society declined a temporary extension to its licensing deal (while a new one is being negotiated by pan-Nordic hub Polaris) that it claimed would “reduce the payment provided to composers and songwriters for YouTube’s use of music by almost 70%”.
Now YouTube has offered Music Ally its side of the story, saying that despite making good progress with Polaris, it has yet to finalise a deal. YouTube also says that the short-term agreement to cover interim licensing for Koda reflects the performance of the society’s members’ music over recent times.
The post YouTube responds to Koda over Danish music takedowns appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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