Day: 1 juillet 2020

Tools: Smart links roundup

Using smart links is now standard practice for artists of all sizes and, as a result, competition among smart link companies has increased exponentially. Because of this, they are all trying to develop and innovate in ways that make them unique and that help them stand above their competitors.  Here we overview the latest updates […]
The post Tools: Smart links roundup appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Spotify pulled into debate over ownership of ‘The Nod’ podcast

In the music industry, arguments over creators and ownership tend to focus on master recordings and publishing rights: how musicians can retain them from the start, or get them back later in their careers. Interestingly, there’s a similar debate starting in the podcasting industry. 
As The Verge explains, it’s not just about the rights, but also about access to ‘the feed’ – the RSS feed through which a podcast is distributed, with access required to upload new episodes. Many podcasts are very personal to their creators, but if they were employees at a production studio when they came up with them and launched the shows, they belong to the company.
This isn’t illegal or even particularly unusual in the creative industries, but podcast creators are beginning to criticise it, especially for shows that have been cancelled by a studio – and this next bit does feel harsh – with no way for creators to continue them independently.
The post Spotify pulled into debate over ownership of ‘The Nod’ podcast appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

BandLab debuts a new ‘Albums’ tool for self-releasing artists

BandLab is one of the most popular and longest-established online tools for creating music and collaborating with other musicians, although its parent company has diversified into physical instruments and music media – including buying magazines like NME and Uncut.
Now it’s getting into digital distribution for independent artists, with a tool called ‘BandLab Albums’ and the promise of “no commissions, no joining fees”. Musicians can also create bonus content including demo tracks, songwriting notes and behind-the-scenes videos.
Note, this isn’t (yet) about making albums available on external streaming services and download stores, but rather through BandLab itself – musicians can make them available for free, or create a tip jar for payment with whatever minimum amount they want to set.
The post BandLab debuts a new ‘Albums’ tool for self-releasing artists appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda created his new album on Twitch

During the Covid-19 pandemic, a lot of musicians have been thinking about doing more with live-video platform Twitch. But what should they do? Live performances, DJ sets (even though there are issues here), fan Q&As, playing games… All these have been tried.
Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park has been using Twitch to broadcast his actual creation process: the music and artwork for his new album ‘Dropped Frames, Vol. 1′.
Earlier in the lockdown period, Shinoda began streaming live on Twitch every day at 10am PST, soliciting fans’ input with a system of ‘ShinodaBucks’ that they could spend on making suggestions like musical themes, with Shinoda improvising in real time to create tracks in response.
The post Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda created his new album on Twitch appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Who cares about the charts nowadays? Well, 3.2m Brits do…

There’s a notion you’ll see voiced quite often in 2020, which is that ‘people don’t care about the charts any more’ – referring to the official music industry charts, rather than the rankings on streaming services (which are perceived to still carry a certain degree of clout).
The UK’s Official Charts Company is offering a statistical riposte to all this, however: its website broke its quarterly traffic record in Q2 this year, attracting nearly 3.2m unique monthly visitors.
“The engagement figures speak for themselves – music is the beating heart of Britain, and the one and only Official Chart remains one of the greatest snapshots of our lives here, through good times and bad,” was the ebullient statement from CEO Martin Talbot in the OCC’s blog post outlining some of its activities that fuelled the traffic growth.
The post Who cares about the charts nowadays? Well, 3.2m Brits do… appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Weav Music adds voice coaching to adaptive music running app

We’ve been writing about startup Weav Music since 2017, when the company co-founded by Google Maps co-creator Lars Rasmussen signed its first major label deals.
Its first app, Weav Run, was an app for runners with ‘adaptive’ music that changed according to their pace, but not just through speeding it up and time-stretching the tracks. Now Rasmussen and co-founder Elomida Visviki have announced the app’s latest move: the addition of voice coaching, which is also adaptive to the runner’s pace and progress.
There’s a video demo of how it works here.
The post Weav Music adds voice coaching to adaptive music running app appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Delic launches music collaboration / rights management platform

We’ve written about Delic before: it’s a service for musicians and rightsholders to manage, share and collaborate on music, which launched in beta last year, then raised £250k of funding early this year to prepare for launch.
That launch happened yesterday. Musicians can sign up; collaborate with one another and manage those projects, including sharing the files; and also use its tools for making money from their music.
It also has plans to add more features around the management of rights (blockchain ledger registrations included) as well as sync licensing, digital distribution and publishing services.
The post Delic launches music collaboration / rights management platform appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Downtown Music Holdings to host a ’summer school’ this July

The music industry has been talking and thinking about internships a lot recently: specifically how to use them to make sure a diverse group of people are entering the industry, rather than (for example with unpaid internships) catering to a narrow demographic.
One new challenge, however: internships are tough during a global pandemic when many companies are still working remotely. Downtown Music Holdings is trying to tackle that with something called the Downtown Summer School, which it describes as “a free, week-long virtual continuing education program on all aspects of the music industry and the music business”.
It kicks off on 27 July, with sessions from executives in Downtown’s various divisions (Downtown Music Publishing, Songtrust, CD Baby and Fuga) plus external partners.
The post Downtown Music Holdings to host a ’summer school’ this July appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Landr’s latest expansion is ‘Pro Network’ digital marketplace

Landr began life as a startup with an AI-powered tool to automate the mastering of recordings, before expanding into distribution and promotion. It also raised a $26m funding round in July 2019 for more expansion.
Part of that growth involves the launch of ‘Landr Pro Network’, which the company describes as a “digital marketplace that enables professionals to market and manage every facet of their businesses remotely”.
That means people working in the music industry can create profiles showing off their skills and experience, so that people can hire them for projects. Landr will also provide tools to manage these collaborations, including contracts, billing and video chat.
The post Landr’s latest expansion is ‘Pro Network’ digital marketplace appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

MelodyVR’s 2019: £195k of revenues and a £15m net loss

Virtual reality music startup MelodyVR has published its financial results for 2019. The company’s revenues were £195k ($242k) last year, down from £1.2m in 2018.
MelodyVR’s content sales – people paying to watch VR music performances in its catalogue – nearly doubled from £19k to £36.7k, but its revenue from content licensing dropped from just under £1.2m to £158.3k.
With a cost of sales of £1.8m and administrative expenses of £14.2m, MelodyVR reported an operating loss of £15.9m in 2019, and a net loss of just under £15m.
It ended the year with cash reserves of £6.8m, although it has since raised another £10.3m from the sale of shares (it’s a publicly-listed company) to ensure that in accountancy parlance, it’s a ‘going concern’.  Whether MelodyVR’s revenues can ramp up fast enough this year to make that still true in 2021 remains to be seen.
The post MelodyVR’s 2019: £195k of revenues and a £15m net loss appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Covid-19 tipped to spark €4.5bn loss for French music industry

In June, we reported on a claim by French industry body SNEP that the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic could deliver a €235m blow to recorded music revenues in France this year. But that’s just a fraction of the anticipated losses, it turns out.
Another industry body, TPLM (Tous Pour La Musique) which represents all aspects of the French music industry, has put out a report tracking the anticipated impact overall.  “The music industry is expected to lose about 43% of its forecasted revenue, or about €4.5bn,” is its headline claim.
In these calculations, recorded music revenues are expected to come in 20% smaller than expected – a hit of €200m – but it’s the live industry that’s unsurprisingly hardest hit: an 83% drop in forecasted revenues this year, meaning a €2.29bn hit. Collections by society Sacem are predicted to come in at 23% below expectations, a €250m shortfall meanwhile.
The post Covid-19 tipped to spark €4.5bn loss for French music industry appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Report: global app spending was $50bn in first half of 2020

Could a global pandemic take the shine off the growth in the amount of money people spend on and within mobile apps? It could not.
“Consumers spent a combined total of $50.1 billion worldwide on the App Store and Google Play in the first half of 2020,” claimed app analytics firm Sensor Tower. “This was 23.4 percent more than the $40.6 billion we estimate mobile users spent across both stores during the same period in 2019. Previously, revenue had increased 20 percent between the first half of 2018 and 2019.”
So growth is accelerating, even though it’s now 12 years since the launch of Apple and Google’s app stores. Note, Sensor Tower’s figures are about spending, not overall revenues – they don’t include advertising, nor do they include money spent outside those App Store payment systems (Spotify subscriptions, Uber ride fees, Deliveroo payments etc).
The post Report: global app spending was $50bn in first half of 2020 appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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