Day: 27 mai 2020

Former HTC CEO unveils 5G VR headset with its own virtual world

Peter Chou used to be the CEO of technology firm HTC. Now he’s launched a startup called XRSpace, and unveiled its first virtual reality headset, the XRSpace Mova.
It’s lighter than many rivals, and is a ‘standalone’ headset like the Oculus Quest – which means it doesn’t need to be connected to a PC to run its games and applications.
One of its key features is the inclusion of 5G mobile connectivity – look away now, tinfoil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorists – while another is its own virtual world called Manova, complete with avatars for people that Chou says are better than those on rival headsets.
“Today, one of the reasons why VR is not that exciting, is not getting that level of immersiveness, is that it’s lacking very good digital avatars. Today, most of the digital avatars are cartoonish and half body, really not something that we can call your ‘digital self.’ So what we really want to do is to let people really actually recognise this is you,” he told Engadget.
The post Former HTC CEO unveils 5G VR headset with its own virtual world appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

James Arthur gets Super Mario-style Instagram stories game

Earlier this month, we wrote about a marketing campaign for Ministry of Sound that made inventive use of Instagram Stories to create a motorbike-racing game – with fans tapping to avoid obstacles and ravines (i.e. to move to the next story post).
Now the digital agency behind that campaign, F-That, is at it again – this time for artist James Arthur. It’s created a Super Mario-style game (except with Arthur rather than a moustachioed plumber) with a similar obstacle-avoiding structure.
In this case, the game also has a charitable angle, via a partnership with mental health charity SANE and the NHS Charities Together’s Covid-19 appeal. It debuted on MTV UK’s Instagram profile, before moving to Arthur’s and F-That’s channels.
The post James Arthur gets Super Mario-style Instagram stories game appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Eminem taps Community platform for messaging with fans

“Dear Stan, I meant to write you sooner, but I just been busy,” wrote Eminem on Instagram yesterday. “text me, ill hit you back” – with an accompanying phone number.
And no, of course Eminem isn’t giving out his cellphone number to 30.1 million people on Instagram: it’s part of a marketing campaign involving one of the messaging-focused fan engagement platforms.
The link in his bio takes fans to a landing page on the website my.community.com, which is the startup we wrote about back in January 2019 when it relaunched as a competitor to another platform called SuperPhone – Community had previously been called Shimmur, and was one of the first cohort of Techstars Music startups in 2017.
The post Eminem taps Community platform for messaging with fans appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Chartmetric says livestreams boosted artists’ social followings

Music analytics firm Chartmetric has published the third and final part of its analysis on Covid-19’s impact on music consumption.
The study focuses on livestreams, and the extent to which they boosted artists’ social media followings. The conclusion: yes they did.
Chartmetric says that “live streams scheduled by artists from their own channels generated significant lift in follower growth” while “artists making guest appearances on other artists’ live streams also saw meaningful engagement lifts, though perhaps not as substantial as consistent live streamers”.
The study is based on a relatively small sample group: 12 artists with decent followings who livestreamed regularly, with some of them compared to similar-genre artists who had not been livestreaming to explore the effects. 
The post Chartmetric says livestreams boosted artists’ social followings appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

AiMi app uses AI to provide adaptive electronic music

Aimed at electronic music fans, a new app called AiMi is using AI technology to turn existing tracks from artists into adaptive experiences for listeners.
The idea: listeners set the ‘energy’ rate they want, based on a scale of 1 to 10, and the app delivers a flow of continuous music to suit their requirements. AiMi uses a freemium model: people can listen to 30 minutes of free music every day, but if they pay $5.99 a month they can listen as much as they want.
“Unlike traditional systems that use AI to mimic artists, AiMi uses AI to generate music using real beats created by real artists,” is the claim.
The post AiMi app uses AI to provide adaptive electronic music appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

shesaid·so and YouTube Music team up for mentorship schemes

shesaid.so – the organisation pushing for gender equality in the music industry – is launching new virtual mentoring schemes for women and gender minorities in Italy and France. 
The schemes will be supported by YouTube Music, and will recruit 12 mentees in each country who will them be paired with either a local or international mentor (they can choose which). Those wishing to be mentees and mentors have until 7 June to apply.
The successful applicants will then take part in one-to-one meetings between mentors and mentees and monthly coaching sessions between July and November, with all meetings happening online. There will also be sessions with guest experts and topics covered will include public speaking, negotiation techniques, impostor syndrome and more.
The post shesaid·so and YouTube Music team up for mentorship schemes appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

JioSaavn adds ‘Pro Rewards’ feature for paying subscribers

We reported yesterday on concerns that India’s growth in paid music subscriptions has slowed down. Now one of the main Indian streaming services, JioSaavn, has a new initiative that it hopes will make its JioSaavn Pro subscription tier more attractive to listeners.
The new feature is called JioSaavn Pro Rewards, and it’ll offer a range of benefits to subscribers, from three months of livestreamed yoga classes to discounts on e-health services.
JioSaavn is working with partner companies on all this: Sarva Yoga, HealthifyMe, 1MG and Care·fit, with the pitch to listeners being that they could get much more value in the rewards than they spend paying for a JioSaavn subscription – that costs 399 rupees a year, but the rewards for the month of May are worth 2,350 rupees alone, according to the company.
“We want a JioSaavn Pro subscription to add more value to our users’ lives beyond just ad-free and offline listening,” said VP of consumer revenue Mihir Shah. As part of the announcement, JioSaavn said that its subscriber total already grew fourfold since early 2019, although it did not offer any figures with that claim.
The post JioSaavn adds ‘Pro Rewards’ feature for paying subscribers appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Facebook launches Collab, an experimental music-making app

Facebook’s experimental apps team, NPE, is launching a new app – and it’s focused on music.
The app is called Collab, and it’s launching today for iOS as an invitation-only beta that, in the team’s words, “brings together creators and fans to create, watch, and mix and match original videos, starting with music”.
The app is based around the idea of a ‘collab’ – a collage of three different videos that play in sync.
“With the app, you can create your own arrangement by adding in your own recording or by swiping and discovering an arrangement to complete your composition,” explained NPE’s announcement, promising that “no musical experience is required”.
The post Facebook launches Collab, an experimental music-making app appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Intro: BPI and Music Ally’s Music & Tech Springboard Programme

There’s been a radical shift in the way we make, deliver and experience music over the last decade, driven by innovation and partnerships between the music and technology industries.
Innovation isn’t just about the biggest tech companies though: the music industry has its arms open wide to talented music-tech startups of all kinds.
That’s why we at Music Ally have teamed up with British music industry body the BPI for a new series of videos called The Music & Tech Springboard Programme, which launches today.
This series of videos explains how startups are working with labels and the wider industry already, and offers practical advice from experts on how these relationships can be as positive and effective as possible.
In this first video, BPI chief executive Geoff Taylor and Music Ally CEO Paul Brindley introduce the series, and offer some initial tips for startups on how best to approach and work with the music industry:
The post Intro: BPI and Music Ally’s Music & Tech Springboard Programme appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Startups explain the lessons they learned working with the music industry

In the Music & Tech Springboard series of videos we’ve produced with the BPI, we’ve heard from collecting societies, lawyers, advisors, accelerators and incubators, and labels about their advice for music/tech startups. But what about hearing from some startups themselves?
That’s what this video does. A group of British startups who’ve all signed licensing deals and/or worked on pilots with music industry rightsholders give us the key lessons they’ve learned along the way, for the benefit of younger companies about to embark on similar journeys.
The post Startups explain the lessons they learned working with the music industry appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Music and technology industry advisors offer their tips for tech startups

Technology and music may be two separate industries, but there are a number of people whose jobs revolve around bridging the gap between the two: helping startups to understand the strategies and priorities of rights holders, and helping rightsholders to grasp the needs of startups.
It’s not uncommon to find these advisors working with one or the other side when deals are being done and partnerships sketched out. Two of the prominent examples in the UK are Cliff Fluet, managing director of Eleven Advisory, and Becky Brook, founder of Becky Brook Consulting.
In this video, they offer their perspectives on how the relationship between startups and music companies can be as healthy as possible, including avoiding some of the well-known pitfalls.
The post Music and technology industry advisors offer their tips for tech startups appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Music licensing: the basics that tech startups need to know

If a music-tech startup’s product or service involves making the actual music available, that company will need licences for the music. Understanding how licensing works is one of the first and most important things that these startups need to understand.
At its simplest level, that also means understanding whether you need to be talking to record labels, music publishers, collecting societies or all three. Thankfully, the collecting societies are a good first port of call for information on this.
This video picks the brains of executives from the two main collecting societies in the UK: Jez Bell, chief licensing officer at PPL, the society which looks after recorded music; and Nick Edwards, head of online at PRS for Music, which represents songwriters, composers and music publishers.
The post Music licensing: the basics that tech startups need to know appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

How can you get press coverage for your music/tech startup?

Like any industry, music has its own set of trade publications and websites that are pored over by executives and staff in the labels, publishers and collecting societies. Meanwhile, there’s also a thriving technology industry media covering startups of all kinds, music/tech included.
Getting featured by key media, from news stories and founder profiles to bigger features about the technology or trend that you’re working within, can be really useful in building your credibility with the music industry – or simply putting you on the radar of the innovation teams working within labels.
In this video, Stuart Dredge, editor at Music Ally, gives a journalist’s perspective on what makes a startup interesting.
The post How can you get press coverage for your music/tech startup? appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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