Day: 22 mai 2020

Imagine if Fortnite had a music streaming partnership…

We’ve been thinking a lot about Fortnite and music recently. Travis Scott attracted 27.7 million people to his recent ‘Astronomical’ concerts within the popular game, while its new Party Royale mode has already hosted DJ sets from Diplo, Steve Aoki and Deadmau5.
There are quite a few unanswered (as yet) questions around this: for example, the nature of the deals being done with these artists, not to mention the potential licensing implications around virtual performances to millions, sometimes tens of millions of people.
However, it’s also made us wonder what more Fortnite might be able to do with music, and specifically, what it might be able to do with a music streaming partnership (or partnerships). How might music streaming be integrated into Fortnite in interesting ways?
The post Imagine if Fortnite had a music streaming partnership… appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Netflix is encouraging inactive users to cancel subscriptions

Customers paying their subscription even though they’re not using your service? The stuff of dreams, so you’d think (well, you would if you owned a gym, for example).
In a world where streaming services have to keep a close eye on their ‘churn’ rate (cancellations) it might not seem in their interests to boot off those inactive subscribers. But booting them off is exactly what Netflix is doing. Well, it’s not being quite so brutal.
“We’re asking everyone who has not watched anything on Netflix for a year since they joined to confirm they want to keep their membership. And we’ll do the same for anyone who has stopped watching for more than two years,” explained product innovation lead Eddy Wu in a blog post. “If they don’t confirm that they want to keep subscribing, we’ll automatically cancel their subscription.”
The post Netflix is encouraging inactive users to cancel subscriptions appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Andy and the Odd Socks launch new album with kids’ parties

Andy Day is a popular children’s TV presenter in the UK on TV channel CBeebies, but he’s also been building a music career as the frontman of Andy and the Odd Socks.
The band’s new album comes out today (22 May) through Sony Music’s children’s entertainment label Magic Star, and there’s an inventive marketing campaign around it. Over the next week, there’ll be 250 children’s parties happening in the UK: essentially album playback events with games and (occasionally) a drop-in appearance from Day himself.
The post Andy and the Odd Socks launch new album with kids’ parties appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Chantel Jeffries gives Triller exclusive for new video

TikTok is not the only short-form video game in town and Triller has been snapping at its heels for some time, making a strong splash in the US and drawing in hip-hop acts in particular. Triller has now landed the exclusive on the video for ‘Come Back To Me’ by US singer/producer/model/YouTube personality Chantel Jeffries.
The video is made from fan-created content and edited together with AI technology. It plays out in real time where Jeffries and assorted friends connect and collaboratively create the video.
“The main goal Chantel and I always have is to create ‘first of its kind’ experiences while merging Chantel’s digital-first brand and audience with her music,” said her manager, Alexis Fleischer of Timeline Management. “The partnership with Triller highlights an innovative and forward-thinking mindset, bringing our vision to life while creating outbound traffic to partners for streaming music.”
The post Chantel Jeffries gives Triller exclusive for new video appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Get set for Wireless Connect and Electric Blockaloo virtual festivals

Livestreams are all the rage in 2020, but the related ‘virtual concerts’ category is seeing some activity too. Travis Scott’s performances in Fortnite, which attracted 27.7 million people in total, are the obvious example, but there are also experiments happening around virtual reality, as well as other online games.
VR startup MelodyVR has expanded on its partnership with Live Nation subsidiary Festival Republic around the UK’s Wireless Festival. The physical event has been cancelled, but MelodyVR will be putting on “an entire weekend’s worth of unseen performances, exclusive footage, and much more” from 3-5 July instead, including broadcasts in VR from MelodyVR’s studios in Los Angeles and London.
The post Get set for Wireless Connect and Electric Blockaloo virtual festivals appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

ICMP boss warns of Covid-19 financial hit to come in Q1 2021

When people in the music industry talk about the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, they’re often thinking about the immediate hit that artists have taken to their live revenues.
It’s worth remembering that there’s another sucker-punch lying ahead for musicians and rightsholders alike though.
“The particular challenge for the music industry is surmounting the delayed effect. As a rights and royalties-based industry, balance sheets will really redden come the first financial quarter of 2021,” says John Phelan, director general of independent publishers body ICMP. “That’s the crux of why we need close cooperation and to ensure the right structures are in place to adapt.”
He was talking for a feature on the Midem conference’s ‘Insights’ website, rounding up the various ways that the industry has responded so far to Covid-19.
The post ICMP boss warns of Covid-19 financial hit to come in Q1 2021 appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Why is the US share of global recorded music revenue growing?

In 2011, the US accounted for 26% of global recorded music revenues. In 2019, that share had grown to 36% according to industry body the IFPI’s figures, despite that period covering considerable global expansion for music streaming services.
Why is the world’s biggest music market taking an even bigger share of the revenue? Former Spotify chief economist Will Page has some thoughts, published in an article on Billboard.
“One factor: The dollar has been strong, with the trade-weighted exchange rate (measured against a range of currencies) rising 30% from 2011 to 2019,” he wrote. “Also, the world’s second-biggest music market, Japan, hasn’t grown in size over the same four years, fueling America’s dominance. Nearly 70% of Japan’s recorded-music revenue still comes from CDs, but as the CD business struggles with the store closures and distribution issues posed by COVID-19, the United States could increase its share of the global pie even more.”
The post Why is the US share of global recorded music revenue growing? appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

US Copyright Office report concludes tech safe harbours are ‘unbalanced’

Just finished a book and looking for a new, gripping read for the weekend ahead? Here’s a recommendation for you: ‘Section 512 of Title 17’. Admittedly, it’s got no wizards, romance, clutter-clearing tips or Henry VIII lopping people’s heads off. But in terms of music industry politics, it’s got the makings of a thriller.
The report is the US Copyright Office’s multi-year study of Section 512 of the US Copyright Act. That’s the part focused on safe harbours for internet service providers that allow user-generated content. Yes, we’re in ‘value gap’ territory here: the ongoing argument over whether copyright legislation (Section 512 in the case of the US) needs to be updated to – in the music industry’s view – bring platforms like YouTube more in to line with non-UGC services like Spotify in terms of licensing requirements.
It’s fair to say the music industry will be happy with the report. “The Copyright Office concludes that the operation of the section 512 safe harbor system today is unbalanced,” is the killer line. “The Report highlights areas where current implementation of section 512 is out of sync with Congress’ original intent, including: eligibility qualifications for the service provider safe harbors; repeat infringer policies; knowledge requirement standards; specificity within takedown notices; non-standard notice requirements; subpoenas; and injunctions.”
The post US Copyright Office report concludes tech safe harbours are ‘unbalanced’ appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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