Day: 27 novembre 2019

YouTube Music extends free trial and expands ticketing to UK

Christmas is coming, and Music Ally’s list of cheap music-streaming subscription promotions is getting fat. YouTube is the latest in to the festive fray, with a ‘Cyber Week’ offer in the US of an extended three-month free trial of its YouTube Premium tier, rather than the usual one month of free access. That includes YouTube […]
The post YouTube Music extends free trial and expands ticketing to UK appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Teenager tests TikTok policies with video criticising China

TikTok has been under fire recently over accusations that its global moderation policies are too in thrall to the government of its parent company’s homeland, China. The line coming out of TikTok executives in the US this month has been that censorship decisions on the platform in the west are NOT driven by Beijing. That’s […]
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Source: Music ally

Billboard reveals new chart rules for album/merch bundles

As part of a chart battle last year in the US between Travis Scott and Nicki Minaj, all hell broke loose. The latter used her Queen Radio show on Beats 1 to attack the former for using merchandise bundles to drive his album to number one ahead of hers. “Travis Scott is out here selling f***ing […]
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Source: Music ally

Tidal launches personalised video-mix playlists feature

Tidal has launched a new feature called ‘My Video Mix’ which, as you will have guessed from the name, offers a series of video playlists to users. Blending human editors’ recommendations with machine-driven picks based on users’ listening habits, My Video Mix will serve up to eight different playlists grouped by artist and ‘music clusters’. […]
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Source: Music ally

Capitol Gains: Capitol Records talks innovation, startups and music

In September, Music Ally spoke to three of Warner Music Group’s senior innovation and business-development execs, about how they work with startups and innovative technologies. That month, we also interviewed some music/tech startups, who gave some blunt, honest feedback on the challenges they have faced working with major labels in general.
It’s a conversation that’s worth continuing. Our first follow-up is another major-label interview, with three of UMG subsidiary Capitol Records’ innovation leads: Ching-Ching Chen, Josh Remsberg and Nick Osbourne. All three have a palpable enthusiasm for music-tech; were at pains to express that their goals are always artist-first; and that they see innovation as much more than just a new, quick-fix marketing tool.
The wider context: UMG’s overall strategy includes creating a global music-tech A&R network: scouting via a series of partnerships with its Accelerator Engagement Network; through the Abbey Road Red startups incubator; and the idea-exchange hothouse that is the Capitol360 Innovation Center, based in Capitol’s landmark Los Angeles HQ.
The post Capitol Gains: Capitol Records talks innovation, startups and music appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

We need to talk more about legal issues around training musical AIs

When most people think about the potential legal issues around AI-created music, they tend to think about the output – the music itself, and questions like whether an AI-generated track can attract copyright protection. Sophie Goossens, counsel at law firm Reed Smith, thinks that just as much attention should be paid to the input.
“AI is not born in a vacuum, and AI systems do not appear out of the blue. In most cases, their ability to create is directly proportional to the amount of information they are able to absorb and learn from. This body of information is known as the ‘the training set’, and it’s something we should be asking many more questions about,” she says.

Goossens explains that AIs are trained using ‘text and data mining’ process (‘machine-reading’) where they analyse a large set of data – music in the case of musical AIs. It’s the same way humans learn, but when we read books, watch movies or listen to music, that’s not a process restricted by copyright. Machines? Well, it’s different for them.
The post We need to talk more about legal issues around training musical AIs appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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