Day: 31 juillet 2019

Notes of interest from Spotify’s Q2 2019 earnings call

It’s no secret: Spotify’s earnings calls aren’t meant to be interesting. They’re an exercise in repeating key corporate messages; parrying tricky questions; and striving not to say anything that will spook the Wall Street or music-industry horses.
CEO Daniel Ek isn’t the kind of executive who lurches off-piste with controversial, off-the-cuff opinions, and CFO Barry McCarthy is an experienced pro at playing a straight back to analysts’ probing.
In other words, if there are only ‘notes of mild interest’ from a Spotify quarterly earnings call, that counts as a success for the company. With that in mind, here’s a summary of today’s call, which followed the publication of Spotify’s Q2 financials earlier in the day.
The post Notes of interest from Spotify’s Q2 2019 earnings call appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Spotify’s Q2 2019: 108m subscribers, €1.67bn revenues, and a €76m net loss

Spotify has published its financial results for the second quarter of 2019, revealing that the streaming service added 15 million new listeners including eight million paid subscribers during Q2.
Spotify ended June 2019 with 232 million listeners, up 29% year-on-year from the 180 million it had a year ago, and up 7% quarter-on-quarter from the 217 million it had at the end of March this year.
108 million of those active users are now paying, representing year-on-year growth of 31% from its 83 million subs at the end of Q2 2018.
How did this all pay off for Spotify’s financial health? The company reported total revenue of €1.67bn in the second quarter of 2019, up by 31%% from the €1.27bn it posted in Q2 2018. Within that, premium (subscription) revenues grew by 31%% to €1.5bn, while ad-supported revenues grew by 34% to €165m.
Profitability? The company reported a net loss of €76m last quarter, compared to a loss of €394m in Q2 2018.
The post Spotify’s Q2 2019: 108m subscribers, €1.67bn revenues, and a €76m net loss appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna and J Balvin team up for ‘China’

Want a recipe to make a big splash with a music video on YouTube in 2019? Well, you could be BTS or Taylor Swift; you could buy a shedload of Google Ads; or you could round up a bunch of the biggest Latin American artists of the moment for a mega-collaboration. The latest example of Option […]
The post Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna and J Balvin team up for ‘China’ appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

VRJam launches crowdfunding campaign for its AR/VR music tech

Music Ally wrote about startup VRJam in April, when it was trying to raise $500k of seed funding for a technology offering live ‘XR’ streams of music performances in virtual AND augmented reality. Now the company has officially launched its equity-crowdfunding campaign. Now the target is £250k (around $304k) which the company plans to use “to […]
The post VRJam launches crowdfunding campaign for its AR/VR music tech appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Love Island was a big hit for music with more than 1m Shazams

A big chunk of the UK’s telly viewers have been engrossed by the daily ins and outs (literally) of ITV show Love Island. Apple’s Shazam has put out some stats this morning showing the impact on music discovery. Songs featured in Love Island’s latest series, which ended this week, have generated more than 1m tags […]
The post Love Island was a big hit for music with more than 1m Shazams appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

TrackDrip launches its music-streaming service in Suriname

With a population of fewer than 600,000 people, Suriname might not be a priority for the big music-streaming services, but that leaves an opportunity for local competitors. TrackDrip being a brand new example. It’s an on-demand music-streaming service that launched in Suriname (which is off the coast of South America, if you were about to Google it) […]
The post TrackDrip launches its music-streaming service in Suriname appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Mixcloud launches ‘Premium’ subscription and limits free listening

Audio-streaming platform Mixcloud is introducing a new service-wide ‘Premium’ subscription, which will cost $7.99 a month and enable listeners to “access all public shows across the platform without limits”.
Wait, what limits? Ah, that’s the other part of the company’s announcement this morning…
Mixcloud grew as a platform for DJ mixes, podcasts and other radio-style shows, using an ‘interactive radio’ blanket licence to pay royalties to rightsholders for music used in that content. There were rules covering what could and couldn’t be uploaded in mixes, but listening was free.
“In the coming months, this free playback streaming experience on Mixcloud will become slightly more limited. It’s important to us that, as a member of our community, you understand why,” explains a blog post from Mixcloud’s co-founders this morning.
The post Mixcloud launches ‘Premium’ subscription and limits free listening appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Boomy talks AI music: ‘We want to make music that’s meaningful’

“Our goal was never to make music that was good! Maybe someday we will, and people will say it’s good. But our goal is to make music that’s meaningful. That’s a different kind of thing…”
Alex Mitchell is the CEO of Boomy, one of the youngest startups exploring the idea of… well, I would say AI-generated music, but as he’ll explain later, he thinks that particular term is meaningless. Nevertheless, Boomy has developed artificial-intelligence technology that anyone can use to create songs, using its web-based interface.
You log in, choose one of two styles (‘Beats By You’ or ‘Relaxing Meditation’) then a filter (modern, high intensity, maximum thump, electronic, vintage, ambient or unlimited in the former case, and pulses, natural or electronic in the latter), with a third ‘Advanced’ style for people who want to tweak more variables.
Once chosen, it takes around 13 seconds for Boomy to create you a song. Play it, then either click ‘Try Again’ to get another one; ‘Save’ to save it to your collection, or ‘Edit’ to dive in and tweak its settings and arrangements. The more you use it, the better Boomy learns your preferences, and tries to adapt to them whenever it creates you new songs.
The post Boomy talks AI music: ‘We want to make music that’s meaningful’ appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

The next TikTok? 10 more short-video apps taking China by storm

TikTok is currently one of the most popular social apps globally, and it’s making plenty of waves in the music industry, from playing an early role in making ‘Old Town Road’ a hit and becoming an exciting platform for music marketing campaigns, to sparking copyright arguments with collecting societies and speculation about its licensing talks with labels.
If you need a reminder, TikTok was originally launched by Chinese technology company Bytedance, as the international version of its existing Chinese app Douyin. In late 2017, Bytedance acquired the similar (and hugely popular) Musical.ly app and merged it with TikTok, before throwing some serious marketing welly at TikTok to make it a global hit.
So, TikTok came from China, but it’s not alone. In fact, there are a host of ‘short-video’ apps in China that are proving popular alongside Douyin. Music Ally (us, not the app that merged with TikTok) asked Kanjian Music, our partner for the recently-launched Music Ally China, to tell us about some of those other apps. Jennifer Li from Kanjian researched 10 of the most interesting.
They might not break out globally to the same extent that TikTok has, but their features and differences to Douyin may offer some useful hints at how this app category will develop in the coming months and years around the world, not just in China.
The post The next TikTok? 10 more short-video apps taking China by storm appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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