Day: 1 mars 2018

Music journalism: ‘It’s not dying. Actually, it’s changing…’

There’s been a lot of public worrying about the future for magazine journalism in recent times, with magazines and blogs shutting down, freelance journalists scratching around for work, and tensions around issues like clickbait and sponsored content.
The panel was moderated by Roisin O’Connor from The Independent, and included Tshepo Mokoena from Noisey in the UK; Catherine Davis from Interview Magazine in the US; and Julia Brummert from Intro Magazine in Germany.
“I think we all agree that it’s not dying: actually, it’s changing,” said O’Connor as an introduction. Davis talked about how magazines divided by community: indie, hip-hop, rock’n’roll etc. “It seems to me now, that’s not how your average reader goes about finding what they’re interested in reading about a musician and tastes in music. It seems it would be much more broad rather than going to Spin Magazine because you like indie and rock,” she said.
The post Music journalism: ‘It’s not dying. Actually, it’s changing…’ appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

How can blockchain make a real impact on music?

Today’s by:Larm conference in Oslo included a panel on blockchain technology and the music industry. No wait, stop! Don’t click away! Come back!
In fact, there have been so many blockchain panels at music-industry conferences in the last two years, we’ve probably used that intro joke before. It’s true, though, that there’s a bit of a backlash at the moment – not against blockchain tech itself, as such, but around over-promising what it can do for the industry and musicians.
Today’s panel aimed to talk about some of the more practical implementations of this technology around music, and how blockchain can make a meaningful impact for musicians. Speakers included Jaak’s Becky Brook; Reed Smith’s Sophie Goossens; and DBTH’s Virginie Berger. The moderator was Music Ally’s Steve Mayall.
The post How can blockchain make a real impact on music? appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

AI creating music: can we learn to love the algorithms?

Are the new wave of artificial-intelligence startups here to eat musicians’ lunch, or to help them become even more creative? A panel run by Music Ally at the by:Larm conference in Oslo today explored the sometimes-sensitive issues around AI and music.
The panel included Scott Cohen from The Orchard, Sophie Goossens from Reed Smith and Helienne Lindvall from Auddly, and was moderated by Music Ally’s Patrick Ross, who kicked off the session by playing Beatles-ish song ‘Daddy’s Car’, which came out of Sony’s AI labs in Paris (with the help of some humans).
The post AI creating music: can we learn to love the algorithms? appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Spotify files for its DPO: so what do you need to know?

“Feels great to have the cat out of the bag. Transparency breeds trust,” tweeted Spotify CEO Daniel Ek last night. The cat in this instance being Spotify’s long-awaited filing for its direct public offering (DPO), which was published last night.
The document offers the most detailed insight yet into Spotify’s current business and future prospects. We’ve been filleting the filing for the key data and a few surprises.
– Spotify ended 2017 with 159 monthly active users, including 71 million premium subscribers, up 29% and 46% respectively year-on-year. On average, each active user streams 25 ‘content hours’ (music and video) a month – just under 4bn total hours a month, and 40.3bn for 2017 as a whole. “Historically, our premium subscribers have streamed more than three times the amount of content per month than ad-supported Users,” noted Spotify.
The post Spotify files for its DPO: so what do you need to know? appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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