Day: 27 février 2018

Check out the Music Ally digital sessions at by:Larm 2018

The by:Larm festival and conference is always a highlight of the year for Music Ally, and we’re delighted to be heading back to Oslo this week for the 2018 event.
We’re also running five panel sessions and a couple of insights talks during the conference, covering some of the digital topics close to our heart this year. They are:
OUR BY:LARM 2018 PANEL SESSIONS
20 Music Startups You Need to Know About in 2018
Thursday, 11am, Dansens Hus Studio Stage
I’ll be running through some of the music/tech startups we’re watching this year, before discussing them with a panel including Project Everyone’s Göran Andersson, Bertelsmann’s Pete Mathias and DBTH / Armonia’s Virginie Berger. Session link
AI and Music: Can We Learn to Love the Algorithm?
Thursday, 12pm, Dansens Hus Studio Stage
Our director of digital strategy Patrick Ross will be chatting about the new wave of AI music-creation technology, and what it means for human musicians. Panelists include The Orchard’s Scott Cohen, Reed Smith’s Sophie Goossens and Auddly’s Helienne Lindvall. Session link
New Kids on the Blockchain
Thursday, 2pm, Dansens Hus Studio Stage
Every conference has its music/blockchain panel, but ours will be focusing on some practical implementations of blockchain tech in our industry right now. Music Ally MD Steve Mayall will moderate a panel including Jaak’s Becky Brook, Reed Smith’s Sophie Goossens and DBTH / Armonia’s Virginie Berger. Session link
Sustainable Business Models in the Age of Scaleability
Friday, 1pm, Dansens Hus Studio Stage
Are we in a race to the bottom to devalue music generally and strip jobs and value creation from the creative community in our search for the ultimate scaleable global music platform? Music Ally’s Patrick Ross moderates a panel including WIN’s Henriette Heimdal, Auddly’s Helienne Lindvall and Media Deals / Musimap’s Thierry Baujard. Session link
Echoes in the Canon: How Smart Speakers are Shaking Up Music
Friday, 4pm, Scandic Vulkan
There’s a big industry buzz about Amazon Echo, Google Home, Apple HomePod and other smart speakers. But what will they mean for the future? Music Ally’s Steve Mayall moderates a panel of Sonos’ Ninni Lindertz, Lyd og bilde’s Geir Gråbein Nordby, Warner Music Norway’s Bjørn Reinfjell and the University of Oslo’s Anja Nylund Hagen. Session link
OUR BY:LARM 2018 INSIGHTS SESSIONS
Data and Insights
Thursday, 1pm and Friday, 10am – both at Scandic Vulkan
Music Ally’s digital marketing executive Chiara Michieletto will lead a presentation explaining how managers, labels and artists alike can use sales, streams and social media insights to build their businesses. Session link
Future Trends
Thursday, 2pm and Friday, 3pm – both at Scandic Vulkan
Chiara will also be running this session, which will focus on emerging opportunities for musicians – from 360-degree content and virtual reality to new ways to interact with fans. Session link
We’ll also be reporting from some of the other conference sessions at by:Larm 2018, and (of course!) getting to some of the performances around the city of Oslo.
(I can only speak for myself, but Camilla Rosenlund, Billie Eilish, Holy, Sarah Klang, Sløtface, Farao, Superorganism, Ary, Cut Worms and Paradise are on my must-see list.)
We’ll also be aiming to get along to The Orchard’s drinks on Thursday and Spotify’s on Friday, so if you’re there, come up and say hello!
The post Check out the Music Ally digital sessions at by:Larm 2018 appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Smaller channels gauging impact of YouTube’s new policies

As of 20 February, YouTube’s new monetisation policies went into effect, with channels required to have at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch-time in the last year before they are allowed to be ‘monetised’ through ads.
When YouTube announced the changes, it claimed that around 90% of channels affected were making less than $2.50 a month from ads anyway. However, DigiDay has an interesting piece quantifying the impact for multi-channel networks (MCNs).
The post Smaller channels gauging impact of YouTube’s new policies appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Music-making firm Splice buys remix-contest site Indaba

There is more consolidation afoot in the digital music-making space, following the news earlier this month that BandLab was buying Gibson’s Cakewalk division. Now one of its rivals, Splice, has snapped up veteran remix-contests site Indaba Music for an undisclosed amount.
“Over the years, Indaba has connected its community of musicians to over a thousand opportunities with a diverse array of artists and brands like Jack Antonoff, Usher, Snoop Dogg, Robert Glasper, Chainsmokers, Converse, Red Bull, X-Box, Sony Electronics, and hundreds more,” explained Splice in a blog post.
The post Music-making firm Splice buys remix-contest site Indaba appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

Jukedeck takes its AI music to Korea with K-Pop collaboration

2018 may be the year of the AI/human music collaboration. British AI music startup Jukedeck is the latest company to work with musicians in an effort to show it’s a friend not a foe for human creators.
The firm has teamed up with South Korean music stable Enterarts, with some of its K-Pop songwriters taking compositions from Jukedeck’s algorithm and turning them into full songs.
The post Jukedeck takes its AI music to Korea with K-Pop collaboration appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

SiriusXM CEO criticises proposed US Classics Act legislation

The proposed Classics Act is trying to clear up the digital-licensing status of songs recorded before 1972. When it was introduced earlier this year, we noted that Pandora was supporting the bill, in stark contrast to satellite-radio firm SiriusXM – despite the latter now being one of its main investors.
Now SiriusXM CEO Jim Meyer has written an op-ed piece for Billboard explaining his opposition to the legislation.
“The Classics Act does not ‘primarily affect’ digital audio services, it only affects digital audio services. Congress has again specifically exempted terrestrial radio from any payment obligation to the artists that the Classics Act purports to champion,” wrote Meyer, in a piece suggesting that “terrestrial radio, a $15 billion industry, has set the stage to tilt the playing field in its favour”.
The post SiriusXM CEO criticises proposed US Classics Act legislation appeared first on Music Ally.
Source: Music ally

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